Troop 101 Home Page 1950 Ki-Ann Indians Show


Tickets for Scout Show Now on Sale

Copyright Wyoming State Tribune, May 9, 1950, p. 4

Used with Permission
Tickets for the Ki-Ann Indians' second annual spring show, which will be presented at 8 o'clock Friday and Saturday evenings, May 26 and 27, in the McCormick junior high school auditorium, went on sale today.

Boy Scouts of Explorer Post 101, sponsored by the Lions club, are in charge of the sale of tickets.


Ki-Anns to Present 65th Performance

Copyright Wyoming State Tribune, May 15, 1950, p. 7

Used with Permission
When the Ki-Ann Indians present their show here Friday and Saturday nights, May 26 and 27, at the Junior high school it will mark their 65th and 66th performances.

The Ki-Anns are Boy Scouts of Explorer Post 101 of Cheyenne. During the past 2 1/2 years they have gained a reputation of being one of the best group performers of authentic Indian dances in the country.

With costuming valued at nearly $12,000 the Ki-Ann Indians are planning a bigger and better show than ever with many new dances that have never been presented to audiences in this part of the country.

This novel Boy Scout troop is sponsored by the Cheyenne Lions club and all proceeds of the show will go to help pay for a bus the troop is purchasing. Tickets can be obtained by Boy Scouts of Troops 101, 104, 112 and Explorer Post 101.


Chippewa Dance on Ki-Ann Schedule

Copyright Wyoming State Tribune, May 15, 1950, p. 7

Used with Permission
The Chippewa tribe Shield dance will be one of the dances the Ki-Ann Indians will present when they perform their second annual spring show at the McCormick junior high school Friday and Saturday evenings, May 26 and 27, it was announced today.

Boy Scout Explorer Post 101, which is sponsored by the Cheyenne Lions club, will present the Chippewa Shield dance in its authentic manner which depicts the Chippewa tribe planning a war party against the Blackfeet tribe that invades their claimed land. The dance will be presented in every detail authentically as possible.

Tickets are still on sale and proceeds will be used to pay for a bus the scouts have purchased.


Copyright The Wyoming Eagle, May 16, 1950, p. 8

Used with Permission

Ki-Ann Costumes Are Valued at Nearly $12,000

Copyright The Wyoming Eagle, May 18, 1950, p. 31

Used with Permission
The Ki-Ann Indians will show their accumulation of Indian costuming which is valued at nearly $12,000 when they present their show here Friday and Saturday evenings, May 26 and 27, at the McCormick Junior high school.

This group of Cheyenne Boy Scouts, who are gaining national reputation by performing their authentic presentation of American Indian dances and ceremonials, have made most of their own costumes which are authentic down to the last thread.

Tickets for this second annual Spring show are on sale by local Boy Scouts and it is the only show that is scheduled for Cheyenne this year. Children under six years old are admitted free while children over six and under 15 are admitted on student tickets which sell for 40 cents. Adult tickets are selling for 60 cents.

Tickets are on sale at Jack's Appliance, Keefe Randolf Firestone store, chamber of commerce and Ranchers Gas and Supply Co.


Ki-Ann Costumes Worth $12,000 To Be Displayed

Copyright Wyoming State Tribune, May 18, 1950, p. 10

Used with Permission
When the Ki-Ann Indians present their 2nd annual spring show at the McCormick junior high school Friday and Saturday evenings, May 26 and 27th, they will show their array of costuming which is valued at nearly $12,000.

The costumes have been made by the Boy Scouts of this group which is becoming more and more popular for its presentation of the authentic art of Indian dancing.

The members of Explorer Post 101 have presented over 60 performances since their beginning three years ago and this spring show will be the highlight of the year's program.

Tickets are now on sale at the following business firms for the convenience of the public: Keefe-Randolph Firestone store, Jack's Appliances, chamber of commerce, and Ranchers Gas and Supply company. Tickets are also on sale by Boy Scouts of Cheyenne and members of the Cheyenne Lions club. Children under 6 are admitted free while students from 6 to 16 years of age are admitted on students' tickets for 40 cents. Adult tickets are selling for 60 cents.


Ki-Ann Show Will Feature Eagle Dance

Copyright Wyoming State Tribune, May 19, 1950, p. 17

Used with Permission
The famed Eagle dance of the Sioux Indian tribe will be a feature of the 2nd annual Ki-Ann Indians spring show next Friday and Saturday nights, it was announced today.

Harlen Lawes, head chief of the Ki-Ann Indian dancers, Boy Scouts of Explorer Post 101, will dance the Eagle dance as it is tradition with the Ki-Anns to have the head chief do this colorful dance.

The stage for this unusual dance will be the 6-foot Ki-Ann Thunder drum which is the largest Indian drum in the world. It took months of practice to perfect this dance which will be one of the most colorful in the show.

Tickets are still on sale at the following business firms: Ranchers Gas & Supply Co., Chamber of Commerce, Jacks Appliance and Sporting Foods Store and Keefe-Randolph Firestone Store. Boy Scouts of Boy Scout Troops 100, 101, 112 and Explorer Post 101 are selling tickets. Proceeds for this year's show will go to help pay for a bus this Boy Scout unit has purchased.

The show is scheduled at the McCormick junior high school.


Copyright The Wyoming Eagle, May 20, 1950, p. 7

Used with Permission

Copyright Wyoming State Tribune, May 22, 1950, p. 2

Used with Permission

Ki-Anns Will Portray Sioux Ghost Dance

Copyright The Wyoming Eagle, May 23, 1950, p. 27

Used with Permission
The famed Sioux Ghost dance which was one of the last great dances to be presented by the great race of Redmen, the American Indian, will be portrayed as an outstanding feature of the Ki-Ann Indian show here Friday and Saturday nights.

Richard Escobedo, past head chief of the Ki-Anns, who are members of Boy Scout Explorer Post 101 will play the lead in the dance as the reviver of the tribe.

There are still tickets available for this 2nd annual spring show, which will be held at the junior high school Friday and Saturday evenings at 8 o'clock. Tickets can be obtained from Boy Scouts, at the door the evening of the performances or at any of the following business firms: Ranchers Gas & Supply; Chamber of Commerce; Jack's Appliance & Sporting Goods, and Keefe-Randolph Firestone Store.


Flaming Hoop Dance Will be Ki-Ann Feature

Copyright The Wyoming Eagle, May 24, 1950, p. 31

Used with Permission
Ted Kelty, one of the few in the entire nation who can perform the celebrated Flaming Hoop dance, will perform it during the Ki-Ann Indians Second Annual spring show here, Friday and Saturday nights at the Junior high school auditorium.

Kelty is a member of Boy Scout Explorer Post 101, who are the Ki-Anns. The Flaming Hoop dance is the regular hoop dance but much more difficult by having the hoop on fire.

Tickets are still available for this show which will be held the two nights starting at 8 p.m. Tickets may be purchased at the following business firms: Chamber of Commerce, Keefe-Randolph Firestone Store, Jacks Appliance company and Ranchers Gas & Supply company. They can also be purchased by Boy Scouts or at the door either evening. Children under six years of age are admittied free.


Copyright Wyoming State Tribune, May 24, 1950, p. 2

Used with Permission

Butterfly Dance Ki-Ann Feature

Copyright The Wyoming Eagle, May 25, 1950, p. 27

Used with Permission
The Ki-Ann Indians, Boy Scout Explorer Post 101, will present the celebrated Butterfly dance in their show here tomorrow and Saturday nights at the Junior High School auditorium at 8 p. m.

The Butterfly dance of the Kiowa tribe is one of the most dramatic of Indian dances. It is the story of life and tells how the various stages of life are important to the Indian. It depicts a cacoon turning to a butterfly and how it lives its summer. When summer nears its end, the butterfly is dying and finally breathes its last when fall arrives.

The Ki-Ann Indian spring show will feature $12,000 in beautiful costumes. Tickets are still available and will be on sale at the door either evening or at one of the following places until Friday night: Ranchers Gas & Supply Co., chamber of commerce, Keefe-Randolph Firestone Store, and Jack's Appliance and Sporting Goods Co. Children under six years old are admitted free.


Ki-Ann Show Will Climax Million Man-Hours of Work

Copyright Wyoming State Tribune, May 25, 1950, p. 2

Used with Permission
The Ki-Ann Indians second annual spring show will be the climax of nearly one million man hours labor when it is presented here tomorrow and Saturday nights at the junior high auditorium at 8 p. m.

The Ki-Anns have gained a region-wide reputation for their authentic Indian dances and arts. They are paleface Boy Scouts of Explorer Post 101 which is sponsored by the Cheyenne Lions club. In the past 2 1/2 years they have built up costuming which is valued at nearly $12,000 and represents one million hours the scouts have put into the project by making their costumes and practicing dances.

Tickets for this spectacular event are still on sale and are available at the following business firms: Ranchers Gas & Supply company, chamber of commerce, Keefe-Randolph Firestone store, Jack's Appliance & Sporting Goods. Tickets will also be on sale at the door. Proceeds for this show will help the troop pay for a bus they have purchased and help send a representative to the National Scout jamboree at Valley Forge, Pa. Children under 6 years of age are admitted to the show free.


Ki-Ann Dancers to Perform Here Tonight and Saturday

Copyright The Wyoming Eagle, May 26, 1950, p. 1

Used with Permission
The Ki-Ann Indians' second annual spring show is set for tonight and tomorrow night at the Junior high school auditorium.

This spectacular show is presented by Boy Scout Explorer Post 101 and is the climax of nearly one million man hours of labor on the part of the Boy Scout troop.

Many famous and interesting dances will be shown in this show, such as the Flaming Hoop dance, the Eagle dance, Medicine Man's dance, Ghost dance, Yie Be Chay of the Navajo, Ute Bear dance, Butterfly dance and others.

Nearly $12,000 in authentic Indian costuming will be the feature of the show with a cast of 30 scouts.

The Ki-Anns are not play Indians but have gained a national reputation for their presentation of authentic Indian dances.

Tickets for this show may be purchased at the door and sell for 40 cents for students and 60 cents for adults. Children under 6 are admitted free. This will be the only performance the Ki-Anns are planning for Cheyenne this year.


Copyright The Wyoming Eagle, May 26, 1950, p. 20

Used with Permission

Ki-Ann Indian Show Will Open Tonight

Copyright Wyoming State Tribune, May 26, 1950, p. 7

Used with Permission
The Ki-Ann Indians, displaying nearly $12,000 worth of authentic Indian costuming, will stage their second annual spring show tonight and tomorrew night at the Junior high school auditorium at 8 p. m.

Numerous famous and interesting Indian dances such as the Flaming Hoop dance, the Ute Bear dance, the Eagle dance, Chippewa Shield dance, and the Ghost dance, as well as many others, will be presented.

This spectacular show, featuring a cast of 30, is being presented by Boy Scout Explorer Post 101 and is the climax of nearly one million man hours of labor on the part of the Boy Scout troop.

The Ki-Anns are not "play" Indians, but present their show in the authentic manner for which they have gained a national reputation.

Tickets for the two performances will be on sale at the door and proceeds for this outstanding attraction will be used to help pay for a bus the scouts have purchased. Student tickets are 40 cents while adult tickets are only 60 cents. Children under six are admitted free.

This will be the only performance the Ki-Anns are planning for Cheyenne this year.


Ki-Anns Thrill Audience With Novel Dances

Copyright The Wyoming Eagle, May 27, 1950, p. 43

Used with Permission
Cheyenneites will have their last chance of the season to witness the famous Ki-Ann Indian show at the Junior high school auditorium tonight.

A capacity audience viewed the Cheyenne Boy Scout troop in its initial home appearance of the season last night and applauded the entertaining and colorful performance throughout.

The Cheyenne youngsters, members of the Boy Scout Explorer Post 101, received high praise from list night's audience which watched the famed troop put on its interesting Indian dances. The colorful coltumes valued at more than $12,000 thrilled the children and parents alike.

A cast of 30 youngsters performed such famous dances as the Flaming Hoop dance, the Ute Bear dance, the Eagle dance, Chippewa Shield dance and the Ghost dance.

The entire show was well organized and each dance was explained with exciting and colorful background. Each dance was thoroughly planned and studied, and had the authentic interpretation of the original dances preformed by tribes many years ago.

The Ki-Anns are gaining a national reputation and last night's performance was an indication of their growing popularity. The show fascinated the audience, especially the children during every act.

Tonights performance will begin at 8 o'clock. Tickets for the youngsters are 40 cents while adult tickets are only 60 cents. Children under six are admitted free.

Tickets are available at the door.


The Eagle SALUTES

Copyright The Wyoming Eagle, May 30, 1950, p. 1

Used with Permission
For his outstanding accomplishments in organizing and developing the Ki-Ann Indian dancers of Cheyenne, The Wyoming Eagle salutes Fred Kaysbier, scoutmaster of Boy Scout Troop 101.

The overwhelming success of the Ki-Ann performances this past weekend is a tribute to this scouter, who has worked for three years with the boys of 101 to bring them to the state of perfection they demonstrated Friday and Saturday evenings in their interpretive Indian dance programs. Both nights there was standing room only in McCormick junior high school auditorium before the first number of the show started. The more than capacity audiences were among the most enthusiastic Cheyenne has seen in a long time, and after both performances several hundred delighted spectators thronged backstage to congratulate the troop on the excellence of its interpretations and executions of the dances.

Fred Kaysbier had the idea of using Indian dances as a project for his Troop 101 several years ago and has had the program really underway for three years. He does the research on the dances, getting his information from books and from several Indian tribes he has visited; then he coached the boys on the meaning and interpretation of the different dances.

Not only do the boys study and practice their routines twice a week, but they make their own costumes, which are strictly authentic. Their workshop is the scoutmaster's basement, which is always full of beads, feathers, tanned hides, and usually a few Ki-Anns fashioning some headress or other item of Indian adornment. For the performances of the past weekend the boys also made their own advertising posters.

Fred is proud of Troop 101, as he may well be. It is the largest troop in the Long's Peak Council of the BSA and has the highest ratio of advancement of any troop in the Cheyenne district and probably in the Council. Thirty boys ranging in age from 14 to 18 years comprise Explorer Post 101, which is the Ki-Ann group, and presently there are more than 100 boys on the waiting list for admission. The regular Boy Scout Troop 101 consists of about 70 11 to 14-year-olds. All members of 101 organization are first class scouts except for 10, a distinction in which the troop takes considerable pride.

Fred Kaysbier was born in Cheyenne and attended the local public schools. After graduation from Cheyenne High school in 1944 he served for a year in the U. S. Navy and then attended the University of Wyoming for two years. At present he is employed at the Ranchers and Gas and Supply Co.

Active in scouting affairs since he joined Troop 101 as a tenderfoot, Fred took over management of the troop during the war when the at-that-time scoutmaster went into the army. During his career in the BSA organization he has taught more than 800 boys scouting, which accomplishment is something of a record for a young man of 23. He gives all the credit for the phenomenal success of the Ki-Anns to the boys, but the concensus is that the lion's share belongs to his leadership and hard work with the troop.

Fred makes it clear that the Ki-Anns are not imitation nor competing with the famous Koshare dancers of the LaJunta, Colo., Boy Scouts, as he says there is certainly room enough for two Indian dance troops in the West.